How indoor cycling benefits your mental + physical health

How indoor cycling benefits your physical and mental health

Indoor cycling studios are quickly taking the fitness world by storm. While there are plenty of ways to get your workout these days, spinning stands out as one of the best. Stationary spin bikes allow you to focus on what’s happening in your workout. Your speed and resistance help you build muscle through strength training while weights and choreography make it a full body workout. The benefits of indoor cycling aren’t just physical either. Making spin class a part of your regular fitness routine can have a positive impact on your mental health as well.

If you are looking to step up your cardiovascular health and take care of your bones and joints look no further than your local indoor cycling studio. A typical spin class will combine resistance training and speed intervals with choreography intended to give you an intense full body workout that can burn anywhere from 300-600+ calories in one class. In addition to the benefits of combining cardio and strength training, it’s easy on the knees. Cycling uses repetitive low impact motions that can help strengthen bones and keep joints lubricated which can help you avoid future damage, while also being a great option for individuals recovering from previous injuries. Research has shown that regular cardio exercise can boost your natural energy levels, increase endurance and improve your oxygen uptake which means more oxygen, blood and nutrients are flowing to your muscles. Cycling is an excellent low impact workout with maximum results.

Investing in the right indoor cycling shoes can significantly enhance your workout experience. Proper gear, like well-fitted shoes, ensures optimal foot support, reducing the risk of discomfort or injury during intense cycling sessions. When you clip into the pedals with recommended indoor cycling shoes, you gain improved power transfer and efficiency, allowing for a smoother ride and maximizing the benefits of your workout. Upgrade your gear for a more comfortable, efficient, and enjoyable indoor cycling experience. We recommend Shimano indoor cycling shoes with Spd clip ins for the best ride.

In addition to the physical benefits of spinning, you will likely begin to see an improvement in your mental health as well with regular spin classes. Cardio exercises release endorphins, also known as happy hormones that help to lower stress and cortisol levels. These endorphins can also help relieve the physical symptoms of anxiety. Indoor cycling workouts can increase your focus and mental clarity as well as improving your rest and sleep habits. If you are struggling to pick up a new workout routine, it is important to find exercise you can enjoy doing so that making it a part of your day becomes fun. Taking classes at your local cycling studio allows you to meet and join a community of people who have similar interests and meet new friends.

Our favorite part of spin classes? The high energy music that keeps you going! Indoor cycling is gaining in popularity and for good reason. Combining a calorie scorching cardio workout with resistance and strength training, indoor cycling builds lean muscles, boosts energy and keeps your bones and joints healthy. Not to mention improved focus, less stress and better sleep. If you haven’t given spinning a try yet, join us for a class and see what you’ve been missing! 

Disclosure: As an amazon associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

 

Top 5 benefits of Barre classes

Top 5 Benefits of Barre Classes

Barre is a unique form of full-body exercise that combines positions and moves borrowed from ballet with small, repetitive muscle movements. Barre classes have increased in popularity over the years as fitness lovers are discovering its fun, distinctive format and numerous benefits.

Some of the many benefits of barre classes include:

Benefit #1: Overall Muscle Toning and Strengthening
Barre classes offer a full body workout, toning your core, glutes, arms, and thighs/legs. Due to its use of small, isometric movements, barre often targets the deeper muscles in the body that are missed in other high-intensity workouts—and instructors may incorporate light weights, resistance bands, and/or stability balls to work your muscles even harder.

Benefit #2: Increased Flexibility and Mobility
Barre classes focus on both strength and flexibility, often incorporating several stretching and lengthening exercises throughout. This increased mobility and range of motion are helpful not only for future workouts, but for everyday life. Don’t worry, no flexibility is required to begin taking barre classes, but you’ll be impressed with how much your flexibility improves after just a few weeks!

Benefit #3: Better Posture and Balance
Because barre classes are both strengthening and lengthening for your muscles, you may notice improved posture and balance over time. Barre focuses heavily on maintaining proper alignment and strengthens your chest and shoulders, which helps prevent slouching. Good posture has benefits beyond what you may realize: it can help with deeper breathing as well as prevent back pain and injury.

Benefit #4: Reduced Stress and Increased Clarity
Like all forms of exercise, barre is great for reducing stress and increasing mental clarity. More than some higher-intensity workouts, though, barre requires a deep intentional focus and mindfulness to maintain a mind-body connection. Exercise also leads to increased production of the endorphins that keep our minds sharp and clear.

Benefit #5: Faster Recovery and Lower Impact than Other Workouts
Barre is an excellent form of low-impact exercise that can be easily modified, making it safe and accessible for people of all life stages (including pregnancy) and skill levels. Barre’s gentleness on the joints also leads to faster recovery times, meaning fewer rest days needed between classes and a decreased chance of injury during and after the workout.
The benefits of barre are almost endless for beginners and pros alike—so what are you waiting for?

Jump in and schedule your next barre class today.

barre vs strength training: which is best for your workout?

Barre vs. Strength Training: What is Best for Your Workout? 

The vast array of fitness classes and workout options available today can be both exciting and, let’s face it, overwhelming. With so many styles to choose from, it can be difficult to know what workouts best suit our lifestyle and will benefit us most in the long run. 

In this blog, we’ll unpack the basics of two popular workouts, barre and strength training, discuss the unique benefits of each workout, and explain what workout is best for your fitness goals.

Understanding Barre vs. Strength Training 

Barre is a form of full-body exercise that combines movements and positions borrowed from ballet with low-impact, repetitive strength exercises, designed to isolate and strengthen muscles. Barre classes often rotate through sections focusing on arms, core/abs, and lower body, repeating small, isometric movements targeting one muscle area until all muscles are fatigued. While barre can be done without equipment, classes typically incorporate a ballet barre and light weights, resistance bands, sliders, and/or exercise balls.

In our years of experience, barre at home can be just as effective if you have a portable barre system and the right guide. We encourage our home fitness folks to try the Booty Kicker for home barre success. It’s compact enough to slip into the closet, is sturdy (that’s a big one) and has slats at the bottom for free weights. 

Strength training (also known as resistance training) is a form of exercise focused on gaining muscle mass, building strength, and increasing endurance. Strength training encompasses a wide variety of exercises, using body weight or equipment, with a focus on building muscle mass in all major muscle groups. Bodyweight exercises like lunges, squats, push-ups, and planks are examples of strength training, as are movements that incorporate weights and resistance machines. 

For at home or in studio strength training, we prefer SPRI dumbbells lined in vinyl. If the weights are not protected, they will start to peel and shed rather quickly. You can purchase a range of sizes (recommended) to gain gradually and safely. If you’re new to strength training, start with a low weight of 2 or 3 pounds. After curling a few reps, those light weights will feel much heavier. Continue to progress to heavier weights until you meet your new “edge” and comfortability.

The Benefits of Barre 

Barre offers a full body workout, toning your core, glutes, arms, and thighs/legs. Due to its use of small, isometric movements, barre often targets the deeper muscles in the body that are missed in other workouts. And, because barre is low-impact and easy on joints and muscles, there is a decreased chance of injury and recovery is often faster than higher-intensity workouts. 

Barre classes focus on both strength and flexibility, often incorporating stretching and lengthening exercises throughout. These exercises contribute to increased mobility and range of motion that are beneficial in everyday life and lead to better posture and balance, as well. 

The mind-body connection and focus required for barre classes help reduce stress and increase mental clarity—not to mention the feel-good endorphins that come after. 

The Benefits of Strength Training 

The most obvious benefit of strength training is an overall increase in muscle mass and a toned physique. However, strength training also helps build bone density, joint flexibility, and balance—all of which lead to a higher quality of life and a lower risk of injury overall. 

Strength training may also be an ideal form of exercise for those pursuing fat loss, as increased muscle mass leads to a higher resting metabolic rate. This means that your body consistently burns more calories when at rest, rather than just during your workout. 

Alongside its physical benefits, consistent strength training also contributes to overall health and longevity, better sleep, and mental clarity. 

Barre vs. Strength Training: What is Best for Your Workout? 

The simple answer is that both exercises can be extremely beneficial for your overall health and what workout is “best” will depend on your unique fitness goals and preferences. 

We recommend incorporating a combination of barre, strength training, and other exercises into your routine to increase your overall strength and help you avoid injury, mental boredom, and burnout. Switching up your workouts will continue to challenge your body and help you see more consistent results over time. 

However, when it comes to exercise, it’s also important to do what you love—if a barre class gets you excited to wake up in the morning, do that! If a strength training plan helps you unwind after a long day, do that! Prioritizing the forms of exercise that you 

enjoy the most will ensure you stay consistent over time and see exercise as a gift to your body and mind, not a punishment. 

Whether it’s a strength class, a barre class, or one of our fusion options, Fever would love to be a part of your fitness journey. Schedule a class today. 

page3image36578864.png

 Disclosure: As an amazon affiliate we earn off qualifying orders

Barre Class:Terms to know before you hit the barre

Barre Class: Terms to Know Before You Hit the Barre

Barre is an increasingly popular form of full-body exercise, combining movements and positions borrowed from ballet with low-impact, repetitive strength exercises. Although somewhat similar to other toning workouts like pilates, there are many pieces of equipment, positions, and movements that are unique to barre.

To help prepare you before you hit the barre, here are some common terms to know:
Barre Equipment Terms: Ballet Barre: In barre classes, a ballet-style barre is often used for support during exercises (hence the name!).

Stall Barre: A stall barre is a tall piece of exercise equipment with rungs of various heights, like a ladder. The stall barre is often used for stretching and corrective exercises. Typically, people hold the very top rung and allow their bodies to hang and lengthen.

Barre Positions to Know:
● First Position: In first position, you are standing on the floor with your heels touching and your toes apart, forming a narrow V shape.
● Second Position: In second position (also sometimes called “wide second”), you are standing on the floor with your feet slightly wider than shoulder distance and your toes slightly pointed on an outward diagonal.
● Parallel: In parallel position, you are standing on the floor with your feet straight and facing forward (like the number 11), either together or hip-width apart.
● Neutral Spine: A neutral spine is a relaxed position where your back is perfectly in line from the tailbone to the spine to the neck and head, not straining in either direction.
Barre Movement Terms:

● Pulse: A pulse is a small, controlled muscle movement. Typically done to the beat of music, pulses involve a small range of motion, often indicated by the phrase “up an inch, down an inch.”

●Relevé: Taken from ballet, this instruction simply means to lift your heel(s) off the ground.
Point/Flex: A point is when you extend your toes pointing away from your body, lengthening your leg muscles. The opposite of a point, a flex is when you pull your toes upward toward your body, stretching your calves and hamstrings.
●Plié: Also taken from ballet, a plié means to bend the knees and straighten them again, typically with hips and feet turned outward and the heels pressed together. Tuck: A tuck is a movement involving your pelvic muscles, done by dropping your tailbone down and then pulling your abdominal muscles up toward your spine. This move is often performed lying down, pushing the hips forward rhythmically to a beat.
●Seat Work: In barre, seat work refers to exercises and movements focused on your hamstrings/upper thighs and glutes—the area that touches a seat.
If it’s familiar with the equipment and to ask any questions to the instructor beforehand. If you still feel confused or unsure of how to use the equipment or how to perform certain exercises, your barre instructor is an expert there to help you succeed and get the most out of all barre has to offer!

Ready to get started? Schedule your first barre class at YogaFever | Yoga Cycle Strength today!

Indoor Cycling: What is it? What are the benefits?

Indoor Cycling: What Is It? What are the Benefits?

Indoor cycling is a workout that has become vastly popular in recent years. You may be wondering: What exactly is indoor cycling? What are the benefits of indoor cycling? And why should I choose indoor cycling over a different form of exercise? We’ll walk through all of that and more.

What Is Indoor Cycling?

To put it simply, indoor cycling is a form of cardio exercise performed on a specific style of stationary bike. Indoor cycling classes typically follow an interval style, rotating between resistance work, speed work, and combination endurance, mimicking the “hills and valleys” of an outdoor cycling experience. These classes are often characterized by their intense pace and high-energy music and atmosphere.

The Benefits of Indoor Cycling

The fun music and upbeat vibes at an indoor cycling class are sure to put you in a good mood, but the benefits don’t end there. While this type of cycling is primarily thought of as a high-intensity cardio workout, it’s also great for building lower body strength.

Alongside the obvious cardiovascular benefits of this heart-pumping workout, you’ll find that it strengthens and builds your core, calves, hamstrings, quads, and glutes. Some instructors will even incorporate upper body strength work into their classes, either body weight or with a light dumbbell or bar, making indoor cycling a full-body burn!

The Equipment Needed for Indoor Cycling

One awesome perk of indoor cycling is that there is very little equipment needed to get started. Whatever workout apparel you typically exercise in should work just fine for your indoor cycling class. However, cycling-specific shoes are the one piece special equipment you may want to invest in.

Most bikes at cycling studios and gyms will have pedals suited for either regular tennis shoes that slide into toe cages with straps, or cycling shoes that clip into the pedals.

So, unless your studio requires them, cycling shoes aren’t totally necessary—but they do have some clear advantages over regular road shoes.

Cycling shoes that clip-in securely to your bike pedals will increase your stability and power during your workout. They also decrease risk of injury by making sure your weight is evenly distributed throughout your feet, and that your feet won’t slide off the pedals mid-workout. We recommend Shimano brand for comfortability and longevity.

 

Why Choose Indoor Cycling?

If you’ve gotten this far and are still wondering, “why choose indoor cycling over a different type of exercise?,” there are a few unique benefits worth noting.

As previously mentioned, indoor cycling classes work in an interval style that is challenging for both your muscles and your heart. But did you know that this type of training actually gets your heart and metabolism working faster than a typical steady-state workout? That means more calories burned during your workout and even after the fact (due to higher oxygen consumption post-workout)—making indoor cycling a great choice for fat burn and weight loss.

Another benefit of indoor cycling is that it is low-impact, meaning you can expect less joint pain, lower risk of injury, and shorter recovery periods between workouts compared to an activity like running.

Last but not least, indoor cycling classes are known for their fun and encouraging atmosphere. At most studios, you can expect dimmed lights, upbeat music, and an energetic spirit that makes classes feel more like a party than a workout!

Now that you know all the basics and unique benefits of indoor cycling, it’s time to get your cycling journey started! Book your first class at Fever | Yoga Cycle Strength.

 Disclosure: As an amazon affiliate we earn off qualifying purchases

Do I Need Special Cycling Shoes for Indoor Cycling?

Do I Need Special Cycling Shoes for Indoor Cycling?

As you get ready to take your first indoor cycling class, you may be wondering: do I need special shoes for indoor cycling? If so, what are the best ones?

The beauty of indoor cycling is that, no, you don’t need specific shoes or gear to get started—any tennis shoe or shoe designed for exercise should work just fine on most indoor cycling bikes. However, some bikes may require shoes that attach to the pedals of your bike, called “clip-ins.” Let’s dive into the differences, pros, and cons of indoor cycling with regular tennis shoes vs. designated clip-in cycling shoes.

Indoor Cycling with Tennis Shoes

At most indoor cycling studios and gyms, bikes will be equipped with an option for regular tennis shoes and feature adjustable toe cages and straps to ensure a secure and comfortable fit. So the biggest advantage of indoor cycling with tennis shoes is that you don’t need to make any additional purchases to start your cycling journey.

While tennis shoes often suffice, there are some disadvantages. If you’re not clipped in, you may find that your feet slip out of the pedals more frequently, especially when riding out of the saddle. And because tennis shoes have flexible soles that aren’t designed with cycling in mind, they can put unnecessary pressure on the front part of your foot, rather than evenly distributing your weight. Both of these factors contribute to a higher likelihood of injuring your feet or ankles when cycling.

Indoor Cycling with Clip-In Shoes

There are several advantages to cycling with clip-in shoes. Cycling shoes are designed with hard soles, which ensure that your weight is distributed evenly throughout your whole foot. Because they clip in securely to the pedals of the bike, you’ll also experience increased stability, especially when riding out of the saddle.

Clip-in cycling shoes also allow you to exert more power during your ride and help ensure that the correct muscles in your legs are being targeted as you pull up and push down on the pedals. They can also help prevent injuries in your feet and ankles by keeping your feet secure and aligned with the pedals.

If you’re just starting out your indoor cycling journey, your regular pair of tennis shoes will probably suffice for your first few sessions. But when you’re ready to take your rides to the next level, clip-in cycling shoes will make for a safer, smoother, and more effective workout.

At Fever, the pedals of our AC Schwinn Performance Bikes allow for both tennis shoes or SPD clip-in cycling shoes to be worn. We recommend the Shimano brand to our members and team for the most comfortable indoor cycle ride. Please choose the link below to purchase. As an Amazon affiliate we earn off qualifying purchases.

 

What Muscles Does Indoor Cycling Work?

What Muscles Does Indoor Cycling Work?

Indoor cycling is usually thought of as a cardio activity rather than a strength workout, but when done intentionally, it can provide both benefits. In fact, indoor cycling actually helps strengthen and build some of your biggest and most important muscle groups! So, what muscles does indoor cycling work?

Indoor Cycling Strengthens Your Lower Body

Because indoor cycling is mostly a lower body focused workout, most of the “burn” is felt throughout the legs in the thighs (hamstrings and quadriceps), calves, and in the glutes. These are some of the largest muscle groups in your body, and when strengthened, help to improve your overall health and physique.

The higher the resistance on your bike, the more strain you will feel on the muscles in your legs when seated. Rising up into a standing position (“out of the saddle”) and hinging your body forward while indoor cycling is particularly effective in targeting your gluteus muscles.

Selecting the right indoor cycling shoes is a game-changer for your workout routine. Experience heightened comfort and reduce the risk of injury with well-fitted shoes that provide optimal foot support during intense cycling sessions. Clipping into the pedals with our recommended indoor cycling shoes not only enhances power transfer and efficiency but also ensures a smoother ride, amplifying the benefits of your workout. Elevate your cycling experience by upgrading to gear that prioritizes comfort, efficiency, and overall enjoyment of your indoor rides. Click the image below to purchase our recommended brand.

Indoor Cycling is Great for Your Core

Your core is the key to proper form when indoor cycling. A strong core will help ensure that your body stays in the correct upright position both in and out of the saddle—leaning forward toward the handlebars, but without any strain on your back or weight in your arms. As you strengthen your core, you’ll notice increased stability and strength in all of your workouts and routine daily activities.

Indoor Cycling Build Strength in the Arms

When practicing proper form on your bike, there should be little to no strain on your arms. However, some indoor cycling classes will incorporate your upper body into the workout through bodyweight push-ups on the bike or through the use of added dumbbells or a weighted bar.

Indoor Cycling Works Your Heart and Lungs

Your heart is arguably the most valuable muscle you can develop. All forms of cardio exercise, like indoor cycling, help to increase the output capacity of your heart as well as the ability of your heart and lungs to consume oxygen (called your VO2 max). And improving the health of your heart and lungs is vital to overall health and quality of life.

It’s clear that indoor cycling provides numerous benefits for your body, both in stamina and strength. Are you ready to get started building muscles in a fun and approachable way? Schedule your first spin class at Yoga Fever.

Is Indoor Cycling A Good Workout?

Is Indoor Cycling a Good Workout?

Indoor cycling classes are often known for their upbeat music, fast pace, and party-like atmosphere. But is indoor cycling really a good workout? Can an exercise that’s fun be effective, too? Let’s explore the strength, cardio, and weight loss benefits of indoor cycling.

The Strength Benefits of Indoor Cycling

Indoor cycling helps to build and strengthen many of the largest muscle groups in your body, including your calves, hamstrings, quads, and glutes. These core muscles power your cycling workout—and the higher you set your resistance, the harder these muscles will work.

Cycling also helps to strengthen your core, which keeps your body aligned and stable when sitting or standing on the bike. Cycling instructors may also incorporate upper body work into a class through the use of dumbbells, a weighted bar, or through push up movements on the bike.

Investing in the right indoor cycling shoes can significantly enhance your workout experience. Proper gear, like well-fitted shoes, ensures optimal foot support, reducing the risk of discomfort or injury during intense cycling sessions. When you clip into the pedals with recommended indoor cycling shoes, you gain improved power transfer and efficiency, allowing for a smoother ride and maximizing the benefits of your workout. Upgrade your gear for a more comfortable, efficient, and enjoyable indoor cycling experience.

The Cardio Benefits of Indoor Cycling

Cardio exercises, especially those that are medium to high-intensity like indoor cycling, are extremely beneficial for cardiovascular health. Regular cardio exercise helps increase the output capacity of your heart as well as your VO2 max—the ability of your heart and lungs to consume oxygen.

This improved capacity and stamina in your heart and lungs means that you’ll be able to cycle and exercise harder, faster, and for longer. And even more importantly, your heart and lungs will be healthier for your everyday activities and life.

Tip: One extra benefit of indoor cycling over other cardio activities like running is that it is low-impact and easier on your joints. That means shorter recovery times and a lessened risk of injury over time.

The Weight Loss Benefits of Indoor Cycling

The interval style of indoor cycling classes offers unique benefits for calorie burn and weight loss: most classes include a rotation of focus on high speed, high resistance, and overall endurance that causes your heart rate to rise, fall, and rise again. This style of training gets your heart pumping and metabolism burning faster than a typical steady-state workout, and also contributes to higher oxygen consumption post-workout—meaning that you’ll keep burning calories at a higher rate even after the workout is done.

If you’re looking to challenge your muscles, get your heart pumping, and leave your next workout both sweaty and smiling, indoor cycling is the perfect choice for you. Schedule a class at Fever | Yoga Cycle Strength today.

 

 

 

 

Can you lose weight by indoor cycling

Can You Lose Weight by Cycling Indoors?

Indoor cycling (also known as “spin” or “spinning”) has risen in popularity over the years. But you may be wondering: can a workout this fun actually help you lose weight? AND can I participate in indoor cycling as a beginner?

Short answer: YES! Like all forms of exercise, when combined with a balanced diet, indoor cycling can contribute to healthy weight loss. Here’s how.

The Weight Loss Advantages of Indoor Cycling

All cardio exercises are great for maximizing your calorie burn, but indoor cycling has some unique benefits. Indoor cycling classes typically follow an interval style, alternating between sections that focus on high speed with lower resistance, slower speeds with higher resistance, and a combination of both. This type of workout is especially great for weight loss because it gets your metabolism running faster than an even-paced, steady-state workout would.

This variation of pace and exertion also contributes to higher oxygen consumption post-workout, which means you’ll continue to burn calories even after you’ve finished your session!

Indoor cycling is also great for healthy and sustainable weight loss because it’s low-impact and easier on your joints than most other cardio activities, like running. This ensures shorter recovery times and a lessened risk of injury.

While typically seen as cardio exercise, high-resistance indoor cycling can also help build and strengthen the muscles in your lower body, including your quads, hamstrings, calves, glutes, and even your core! Not only does this help with a stronger physique, but more muscle on your body actually means more calories burned throughout your day—even when at rest.

All of these factors make indoor cycling a fun and effective workout for achieving your weight loss goals. If you’re ready to switch up your cardio routine or start building your stamina, check out the indoor cycling classes at YogaFever | Yoga Cycle Strength.

 

 

Indoor cycling: A beginners guide

Indoor Cycling: A Beginners Guide (Everything You Need to Know!)

Indoor cycling, also known as “spin,” simply means the act of cycling on an indoor stationary bike as opposed to out on the open road. This type of workout has grown in popularity over the years through studio classes like SoulCycle and at-home workouts like Peloton.

Trying a new style of workout can be intimidating, but there’s nothing to fear. Indoor cycling is great for beginners and requires very little knowledge or equipment to get started. If you’re wondering what all the hype is about, read on to discover the unique benefits of indoor cycling and what you can expect at your first indoor cycling class.

What are the Benefits of Indoor Cycling?

Indoor cycling offers numerous benefits for your physical and mental health. Medium to high-intensity cardio exercises like indoor cycling are extremely beneficial for cardiovascular health as they help to increase the output capacity of your heart as well as your VO2 max—the ability of your heart and lungs to consume oxygen.

Indoor cycling helps to build and strengthen many of the largest muscle groups in your lower body, such as your calves, hamstrings, quads, and glutes. It also helps strengthen your core, which acts as a stabilizer throughout the workout.

Indoor cycling classes are often known for their feel-good, endorphin-pumping atmosphere. And because indoor cycling is low impact, you can expect fewer injuries and quicker recovery times than other cardio activities, like HIIT style workouts or running.

Do You Need Special Equipment for Indoor Cycling?

When it comes to clothing, your typical workout apparel is just fine for an indoor cycling class—whether it’s bike shorts, leggings, or anything in between, wear what makes you feel most confident and comfortable.

Some indoor cycling gyms or studios may require cycling-specific shoes that clip into the pedals of the stationary bike, but most have bikes that are equipped with an option for regular shoes as well. It’s always best to check beforehand.

While not totally necessary, cycling shoes have many benefits: they ensure that your bodyweight is distributed evenly across your feet, increase your stability on the bike, help you exert more power with every stroke, and decrease risk of injury. Bikes equipped for regular tennis shoes will often have adjustable toe cages and straps to ensure a secure and comfortable fit—but if you’re not clipped in, you may find that your feet slip out of the pedals more frequently.

What to Expect at Your First Indoor Cycling Class

Indoor cycling classes typically range from 30 minutes, to 45 minutes, to a full hour. If you’re new to indoor cycling, plan to arrive 5-10 minutes before class so that your instructor can help you get settled in. Indoor cycling bikes have adjustment options for height, seat, and handlebar placement, so don’t hesitate to ask your instructor to help you find the perfect fit on your bike.

Your indoor cycling class will start with an easy song or two to warm up your legs. Your instructor should walk you through the various settings on your bike and explain how to adjust your resistance up and down. From there, you can expect a rotation of focus on speed work, resistance work, and overall endurance. Classes typically keep the energy high with loud music and lights, and many instructors plan your workout to match the tempo of the song (beats per minute) to the speed of your legs (rotations per minute).

At certain points in the workout, your instructor may indicate to “come out of the saddle,” which means to move to a standing position. Your instructor may also incorporate arm work into your class through hand weights, a weighted bar, or push ups on the handlebars of your bike. As you near the end of your class, you’ll slow things down and stretch before dismounting the bike.

If it seems overwhelming, know that your instructor will talk you through the whole experience. Don’t hesitate to tone down your speed or resistance, or take a short break, when needed.

With every indoor cycling class you take, you’ll walk away with more strength, more stamina, and more confidence. So what are you waiting for? Schedule your first indoor cycling class at YogaFever | Yoga Cycle Strength today.